Commit 1460fa20 authored by Brad Beyenhof's avatar Brad Beyenhof
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speling check

parent 3c001bf3
......@@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ What Linux can learn from Solaris performance, and vice versa
https://www.socallinuxexpo.org/scale12x/presentations/what-linux-can-learn-solaris- performance-and-vice-versa
Brendan Gregg
This was an amazing talk (It was Saturday's keynote), but I don't think I can summarize it any further than I did in the 'linux_solaris.txt' notes file. THere's also audio/video of the whole thing at the presentation URL listed above.
This was an amazing talk (It was Saturday's keynote), but I don't think I can summarize it any further than I did in the 'linux_solaris.txt' notes file. There's also audio/video of the whole thing at the presentation URL listed above.
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......@@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ There are good things in the slides for #1 and #2, including pros & cons of back
Procedures also need fallbacks, in case things don't work. If the fallback fails, you will almost certainly need to have a meeting to figure things out. Again, NEVER IMPROVISE.
The People section is about knowing whom to call, and to have all SMEs and consultants/contractors listed... as well as the procedure by which we authorize consultant contact (who needs to approve?). Just like procedure documentation, the contact book needs to be in more than one place. Josh recommended using paper as one of those places (in case EVERYTHING blows up), and keeping things up to date. An attendee suggested using a distributed revision control tool (such as git) as a way to maintain data in multiple places (including locally on invidual laptops), and he agreed that it was as good as paper in most cases.
The People section is about knowing whom to call, and to have all SMEs and consultants/contractors listed... as well as the procedure by which we authorize consultant contact (who needs to approve?). Just like procedure documentation, the contact book needs to be in more than one place. Josh recommended using paper as one of those places (in case EVERYTHING blows up), and keeping things up to date. An attendee suggested using a distributed revision control tool (such as git) as a way to maintain data in multiple places (including locally on individual laptops), and he agreed that it was as good as paper in most cases.
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......@@ -105,7 +105,7 @@ This is one that was interesting, but he moved so quickly that I didn't end up t
Basically, Linux Containers are lightweight VMs, much like Solaris Zones, in that they run a process isolated in their own partitioned section of the operating system. (A friend of mine whom I ran into at the conference, and who has run Solaris for years, said he looked at LXC and thought "oh, isn't that cute." Solaris is obviously much more mature when it comes to containerization.) The container has its own process space, its own network interface, can run things as root, and can have its own /sbin/init separate from the host OS. OpenVZ is a tool that virtualizes whole OS instances within containers, but docker is used to containerize just processes (such as apache, mysqld, etc.). The isolation takes place within both kernel namespaces (pid, net, etc.) and cgroups (memory, cpu, blkio, devices).
The cool thing that docker does is that it allows full containers to be portable, so that developers can create a full running system and then just pass it over to ops to run in production, thus eliminating the "this worked in dev, why doesn't it work in production?" problem. THere are obviously a number of concerns to be addressed here, particularly with regard to security, but Docker has just hit version 0.8 and they don't actually recommend using it in production yet. It was cool to hear about how it's progressing, however.
The cool thing that docker does is that it allows full containers to be portable, so that developers can create a full running system and then just pass it over to ops to run in production, thus eliminating the "this worked in dev, why doesn't it work in production?" problem. There are obviously a number of concerns to be addressed here, particularly with regard to security, but Docker has just hit version 0.8 and they don't actually recommend using it in production yet. It was cool to hear about how it's progressing, however.
He addressed the fact that such systems and environments are currently made portable through rsync, scripts, rpm/yum, etc., but he said that the point of Docker is to commoditize the portability aspect and make it all ridiculously easy to use. There are lots of cool details on the slides, which can be downloaded from the presentation link above.
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